Sunday, August 4, 2013

GAY HILL, WASHINGTON COUNTY, TEXAS







GAY HILL, WASHINGTON COUNTY, TEXAS

TOWN: Gay Hill
COUNTY: Washington
LOCATION: The town is located about
nine miles NE of Brenham off of FM 390
that intersects with Highway 36.
FAMILY HISTORY: THE LINDERMAN'S OWNED THE "WISE ACRE" RANCH IT WAS 120 ACRES, 9 MILES FROM BRENHAM, TEXAS IN GAYHILL, TEXAS.  
My maternal grandparents, Harry and Phyllis (Palen) LINDERMAN, owned a ranch, "Wise Acres" and the "Saturday's Tavern" there in Gayhill during the 1950's. Harry and Phyl's daughters and son-in-laws spent many a fun weekend there with them. I was born near there in Brenham in 1954. Yvonne Burgess, Ken and; Billie Jackson, Jean and; Leroy Frederick, and Patsy and; J.E. Cooke. 



Served at Gay Hill pre 1911. From 1911 - 1953 it served as a school for Afro-Americans in the Mound Hill District. It was moved to Independence by the Independence Historical Society.





Gay Hill


Friedens United Church of Christ
Courtesy Mike Woodfin





Gay Hill
Courtesy Mike Woodfin

Gay Hill
Courtesy Mike Woodfin

Gay Hill House
Courtesy Danielle Moore


GAY HILL, TEXAS (Washington County). Gay Hill is on Farm Road 390 twelve miles northwest of Brenham in the rolling hills of northern Washington County. The town was an educational and religious center on the La Bahía Road in early Texas. Rev. Hugh Wilson established the second Presbyterian church in Texas there in 1839. Presbyterians from throughout the republic met in the community, then known as Chriesman Settlement, to organize the Brazos Presbytery in 1840.
By 1840 the Republic of Texas established a post office in the new town under the name Gay Hill, after the owners of the town store, Thomas Gay and William Carroll Jackson Hill.
The beautiful forested hills and healthy climate attracted prominent early Texans, including residents Horatio Chriesman, R. E. B. Baylor, John Sayles, and Dr. George C. Red. Horticulturist Thomas Affleck's Glenblythe Plantation was located in the Gay Hill vicinity.
Old Gay Hill served as the supply point of a moderately prosperous agricultural area. In 1854 a Masonic lodge was founded there. Between 1853 and 1888 Rev. James W. Miller operated Live Oak Female Seminary in Gay Hill. By 1860 the town had flour and lumber mills and a population of 280.
After the Civil War a cotton gin augmented the town's prosperity; retail establishments continued to thrive. The Masonic lodge and Presbyterian and Baptist churches were active.
During the 1870's the town had a Grange and a Democratic Club. The Republican party remained strong among Gay Hill's black residents, despite Greenback party efforts.
When the Gulf, Colorado and Santa Fe Railway extended to the Gay Hill vicinity in 1881, residents moved the town to its present location, two miles west of the original site. The former location is sometimes called Old Gay Hill.
Gay Hill's population was 120 in 1890.
By 1900 Germans were the dominant ethnic group. The town became a distribution center by the early twentieth century. Cotton buying and ginning sustained this station on the Santa Fe through the Great Depression.
By 1936 Gay Hill had an estimated population of 250 and ten businesses. The nearby Sun oilfield, which opened in 1928, and its pipeline enabled the town to maintain a variety of retail and commercial establishments through the early post-World War II era.
The decline of cotton and rise of ranching in the area hastened the town's demise as a distribution center and supply point. The population declined to 200 by 1958, and businesses decreased to five. The last store closed in 1971, when many residents had moved to Brenham.
In 1993 the estimated population was 145, and the community had no businesses; its economy depended on ranching. It had two churches, a cemetery, and lodge hall. The population remained the same in 2000.
BIBLIOGRAPHY: Mrs. R. E. Pennington, History of Brenham and Washington County (Houston, 1915). Charles F. Schmidt,History of Washington County (San Antonio: Naylor, 1949). Vertical Files, Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin. Washington County Scrapbook, Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin.
http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/hlg11 
source: Carole E. Christian

FAMILY ROOTS RUN DEEP!

I HAVE BEEN WORKING ON MY GENEALOGY SINCE 1987, WHEN I TOOK TEXAS HISTORY AT THE SAN JACINTO JR. COLLEGE. I HAD TO WRITE A RESEARCH PAPER, AND I CHOSE TO WRITE IT ABOUT MY FAMILY.

1994 IS WHEN I REALLY STARTED WORKING DILIGENTLY ON MY GENEALOGY, BECAUSE THAT IS THE YEAR MY MOTHER, JEAN MARIE LINDERMAN MANCILL, AND MY STEP DAD, LOUIS CLIFFORD MANCILL, HELPED ME TO GET MY FIRST COMPUTER. NOW, I'M ADDICTED!!!

MY OLDEST BROTHER, JOSEPH LEE FREDERICK, REBUILT COMPUTERS AND SO HE PUT US ONE TOGETHER. MOTHER AND LOU EVEN HAD THEIR OWN COMPUTER.

CAN YOU BELIEVE IT A 67 YEAR OLD WOMAN, AND A 70 YEAR OLD MAN USING A COMPUTER!!!
MY DREAM WAS ALWAYS TO BE AN AUTHOR, LIKE LOUISA MAE ALCOTT, AND I PLANNED TO WRITE A BOOK SOMEDAY. I HAVE WRITTEN SEVERAL POEMS AND STORIES. FOR A LONG TIME I DIDN'T KNOW WHAT I WANTED TO WRITE.

MY DAD, HAD ASKED ME, " WHY DO YOU DO ALL THIS WORK? NO ONE WILL EVER READ IT!" FOR AWHILE THAT KEPT ME FROM WRITING ANYMORE, BUT THEN I DECIDED THAT THERE HAD TO BE SOMEONE IN OUR FAMILY WHO WOULD ONE DAY BE INTERESTED TO KNOW OUR FAMILY HISTORY, AND EVEN IF NOT, THEN MAYBE SOMEONE YEARS FROM NOW WILL BE INTERESTED IN LEARNING HOW WE LIVED.

WHEN I FINISH THE FINAL DRAFT OF MY FAMILY STORY I PLAN TO DONATE A COPY OF IT TO THE GEORGE MEMORIAL LIBRARY, IN RICHMOND, TEXAS, AND ALSO, A COPY TO THE CLAYTON GENEALOGICAL LIBRARY, IN HOUSTON, TEXAS.

I THINK THAT I AM GOING TO WRITE FIRST ABOUT THE STRONG, DOMINANT WOMEN IN MY FAMILY, I HAVE WRITTEN SOME ABOUT THEM, BUT I PLAN TO WRITE MORE AS I GET THE TIME.

MY MOTHER, JEAN MARIE LINDERMAN FREDERICK MANCILL, WOULD BE THE FIRST ON MY LIST. MY GRANDMOTHERS, BESSIE MAZAC FREDERICK, OR PHYLIS PALEN LINDERMAN. OUR NEIGHBOR, DOROTHY JOHNSON, MY SPONSOR BIRDIE MAE NEFF, GLADYS LINDERMAN NELSON, AND YVONNE LINDERMAN BURGESS LEVESQUE.

------ROOTS-------
EACH OF US HAS ROOTS AND THE ABILITY TO TRACE THESE ROOTS, TO IDENTIFY OUR ANCESTORS.

THE HIGHEST AND MOST POWERFUL MOTIVATION IN DOING THAT IS NOT FOR OURSELVES ONLY, BUT FOR OUR POSTERITY, FOR THE POSTERITY OF ALL MANKIND. AS SOMEONE ONCE OBSERVED, "THERE ARE ONLY TWO LASTING BEQUESTS WE CAN GIVE OUR CHILDREN--ONE IS ROOTS, THE OTHER WINGS!!"

What I Like About Texas!

HAPPY 175th. BIRTHDAY, TEXAS!

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